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2021 Fall Date Project

The MPOD Caretakers want to present meteorite falls on their fall dates. For example, Sikhote Aline on 12 February.

This Project will not dip into the MPOD archives so the Caretakers will appreciate anything you can contribute.

To reserve a date just let us know. Thank you in advance :)

Fall Calendar           Dates reserved so far

 

 
Almahata Sitta   contributed by Vincent Haberer, IMCA 6960   MetBul Link


Roll Overs:     #1   #2   #3   #4   #5   #6   #7    


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View all entries for   Meteorite (20)   Contributor (2)


Photos by Vincent Haberer.   Copyright (c) Vincent Haberer.
54.07 grams.   Urelite-an

TKW 3.95 kg.

Pre-Earth-encounter size estimated to be 4.1 meters in diameter and 80,000 kilograms.
Observed approach: 6 October 2008

Observed fall: 7 October 2008

First found: 6 December 2008, Nahr an Nil, Nubian Desert, Sudan.

Many stones from this fall have been classified, with a wide variety of results - Ureilite, polymict, anomalous; bencubbin; EH 4/5; and EL 3.

From the MetBul:
On October 6, 2008, a small asteroid called 2008 TC3 was discovered by the automated Catalina Sky Survey 1.5 m telescope at Mount Lemmon, Tucson, Arizona, and found to be on a collision course with Earth. Numerous astronomical observatories followed the object until it entered the Earth’s umbra at Oct. 7.076 UTC the next day. The astrometric position of 295 observations of 2008 TC3 over the period Oct. 6.278 to Oct. 7.063 was used to calculate the approach trajectory over the impact location in northern Sudan. The object exploded at a high ~37 km altitude over the Nubian Desert, and as a result the meteorites are spread over a large area. A search was organized by the University of Khartoum on Dec. 2–9, led by P. Jenniskens (SETI Institute) and M. H. Shaddad (Khartoum).


       


Vincent writes:
Hello collector friends,

I would like to show you some pictures of an extraordinary meteorite from my Almahata Sitta collection. It is the MS-318 (for sale), a coarse-grained ureilite with a weight of 54.07 grams. The special features of this meteorite are the strikingly large and numerous crystals, and fine iron veins. I have not observed them on any other Almahata Sitta meteorite.

The Almahata Sitta meteorites come from the asteroid 2008 TC 3. This is the first asteroid that collided with the earth after being observed by astronomers. This collision was so spectacular for scientists that all telescopes worldwide were focused on this event. October 7 marks the anniversary of this event.

MS-318 was recovered shortly after its fall, so it is exceptionally fresh and with appropriate fusion crust.

Vincent and Siegfried Haberer


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Found at the arrow (green or red) on the map below

 


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Anne Black
 10/9/2021 3:00:57 PM
Another great Almahata Sitta. The meteorite that keeps on giving and on surprising. And John, I think it is mostly a translation problem.
John Divelbiss
 10/9/2021 11:00:52 AM
Clarification: I know there is METAL in the veins. Rather than being called metal veins...the metal is "vein metal", and part of the veins made of minerals and metal. Maybe just semantics ?
John Divelbiss
 10/9/2021 6:37:26 AM
beautiful strange looking Ureilite. Could the apparent veining around the crystals just be graphite, diamonds, etc. that develops from impact and reduction of olivine grains versus being called metal? Graphite veining can look like metal too. Is the magnet pull strong suggesting lots of metal?
Graham Ensor
 10/9/2021 4:51:13 AM
What a wonderful collection from that fall. Very special.
 

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